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Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium Grant allocation for 2016 - 2017 is as follows:

 

PPG FSM £60,720.00

PPG Post LAC £7,600.00

Impact of Pupil Premium Funding on 2015/2016

Pupil premium progress is exceptional in Year 1, 5 and 6. There are no significant gaps between the progress that Pupil Premium and non Pupil Premium children are making.

Claire Davies, Assistant Headteacher and SENCo

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 to support schools in closing the gap between children from families from low income families or disadvantaged backgrounds and their peers.


The funding is calculated by the number of children on school roll who have been registered for free school meals in the past six years, looked after children or whose parents serve in the armed forces.​

 

School Context

In the 2015 Raiseonline report, the percentage of the school population eligible for Pupil Premium Funding (PPG) was listed as 22% (approx..45 children). This is compared to a national average of 26%.  However, the children are distributed unevenly across the school with the higher %s of PPG pupils appearing in upper Key Stage 2 classes.

 

Current pupil premium allocation for 2015/2016 is £62,040.00

 

How we are going to spend this allocation:

  • As a school we have re-organised TA hours, partly funded by pupil premium funding. It has meant that TAs have protected planning time and teachers and TAs have allocated time to plan and review together. The reason behind this initiative is that research has shown that one of the most effective ways of moving the learning on is for there to be strong channel of communication open between the adults working in the classroom and for all adults to be absolutely clear about what needs to be achieved

     

  • Interventions will be reviewed at pupil progress meetings using the outcomes for each intervention as a measure of impact. We currently have TAs delivering interventions in their particular field such as Numicon, RWI and Speech and Language programmes. Interventions are personalised to the child and each child has an individual outcome for the intervention.

     

  • Mrs Day, our ELSA leader, continues to be a valuable and much cherished staff member. At Meadlands we believe in the importance of emotional literacy. Children would attend sessions for a variety of reasons, such as a recent trauma at home for example a bereavement or a separation, friendship issues in school or support in a school or class transition. Three TAs have recently been trained in the Friends for Life programme by our Educational Psychologist. This programme covers themes such as friendships, anxieties and the importance of nutrition and exercise.

     

  • We have a visiting music therapist and if successful, certain applications will be funded through the pupil premium funding

     

  • We value the importance of vocabulary, talk and the importance of every child being a talker. We are using some of our Early Years Pupil Premium funding on funding family reading workshops in reception, identifying and supporting training for example Speech and Language and Lego Therapy and delivering SALT from Nursery. We are part of a pilot project where our Nursery will work with the Borough Speech and Language Therapist. They will ensure that the Early Years environment promotes quality talk and also support staff in identifying early speech and language needs

     

     

  • LAMDA continues to be a success at Meadlands. Last year over 50 children took the examination and all children passed with either a merit or a distinction. LAMDA develops confidence, self-esteem and also we hope to see it develop a love of poetry and books. It is now in its second year and is part of the Year 3 and 4 curriculum. (please see separate report for LAMDA)

     

  • We will continue to use Pupil Premium to fund educational visits and residential trips as and when needed for pupil premium children

     

  • We are also going to be using it to purchase revision guides, software and educational tools to create homework packs for Pupil Premium children

     

How we spent the allocation for the academic year 2014-2015

  • Family support worker

  • ELSA support

  • Part funds TA salaries

  • Providing financial support to part fund educational visits for pupil premium children

  • Family writing workshops with author, Mary Evans

 

How it made a difference to the attainment of pupil premium pupils

 

Progress Key Stage 2 as measured by Value Added

 

Value Added PPG pupils

2013    

99.8

2014

97.9

2015

100.2

 

Percentage of pupils attaining level 2 or above at Key Stage 1

Subject

School figures

National figures

Pupil Premium  

Pupils

Non pupil

premium pupils   

National Figures for other children

Reading

 

60%

100%

93%

Writing

 

60%

100%

91%

Maths

 

60%

100%

95%

 

Percentage of pupils attaining level 4 or above at Key Stage 2

 

Mathematics, Reading and Writing    

Mathematics

 Reading

   Writing (Teacher assessment)

 

School

National

School

National

School

National

School

National

FSM

82%

70%

82%

80%

82%

83%

91%

79%

Non FSM      

86%

84%

86%

90%

93%

92%

100%

90%

Our LAMDA Project

Be Proud, Be Loud and Be Clear.

Every parent wants their child to have a voice. Every teacher wants their pupils to have a voice. At Meadlands, we want every child to have a voice and be proud of that voice.

Confidence, clarity, self-belief and vocabulary can change lives and that is what we want to do at Meadlands. In the Autumn term of 2014, a project was born.

Following on from half termly pupil progress meetings, it was becoming clear that there were children who were plateauing or not making expected progress in their writing and reading.

We decided that our aims were:

  • to widen their understanding of the texts they were reading

  • to develop inference skills

  • to develop self-belief and confidence

  • for children to improve their communication and language skills

  • to broaden vocabulary

  • to show the children that Literacy can be fun, interactive and exciting

  • to increase more than expected progress across the board

     

We also felt that this was an excellent way to meet the objectives of the new curriculum. Memorising and reciting are prevalent in all parts of the new National Curriculum, with poetry taking centre stage in English. From year one onwards children will have to learn and recite poems by heart while recognising and discussing different poetic forms. At the heart of our school is performance poetry and the excitement of performing.

Through consultation, we concluded that the way to meet these aims was through a project called LAMDA. LAMDA (London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art) exams offer pupils the chance to develop communication and performance skills which go on to inspire children and empower them with language and confidence to speak clearly and confidently.

The LAMDA sessions were led by a parent, Louise Lipton, who is LAMDA trained. The groups learnt 2 set pieces which they then performed at an end of year exam. There were 6 or 7 children in each group and we also had a gifted and talented group. Every child learned by heart the set pieces and dramatised them speaking clearly as a group with individual solo lines for each child. The children were also assessed on their understanding of the poem .

LAMDA sessions, which were funded through the Pupil Premium grant, took place on a Monday and Tuesday afternoon and 44 children took part in the project. Due to the high number of children participating, in June the school became a LAMDA examination centre. This was followed the next day by a celebration recital and picnic for children and their families.

 

What was the impact? 

Impact can be measured in many ways.

  • Academic progress

  • How the children view themselves which has a direct impact on their learning and behaviour

  • If parents had seen changes in their children

Academic progress based on 14 APS

Reading

Expected progress

Making more than expected progress

Year 3

100%

11%

Year 4

91%

55%

Year 5

100%

44%

 

Writing

Expected progress

Making more than expected progress

Year 3

100%

11%

Year 4

91%

73%

Year 5

78%

11%

 

Maths

Expected progress

Making more than expected progress

Year 3

100%

11%

Year 4

91%

45%

Year 5

100%

33%

 

At the end of the project, we asked children about their experience. These are some of their views on the whole experience:

 

We also felt it was important to find out what parents thought of the project. Did they feel it was a worthwhile experience for their child? A definite yes was the answer.

 

Conclusion and the future:

As a school we believe that LAMDA is fast becoming an integral part of our curriculum. Next year, we have decided to focus on Years 3 and 4 to ensure that progress in lower key stage 2 is at least good. We feel that this is the perfect time to cement confidence, communication skills and an excelled disposition to learning.

basic skills agency quality mark 4 healthy schools london bronze award eco-schools award lets get cooking accredited 2013 sainsbury's school games gold 2015/16 Primary Science Quality Mark Silver
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